Batanes Tour Packages

Batanes

My tour around Batanes last year was organized by TRavelYoung, and they recently released a copy of their tour packages, which include accommodations (which you can choose from a range of budget to high-end options), airport pick-up and drop-off, breakfast, lunch during tours, and of course their standard tours around Batanes.

Details of the tours are posted below. For more information, please email book@travelyoung.ph.


3 Days/2 Nights — North Batan and South Batan

3D2N (North & South Batan) RATE SHEET


3 Days/2 Nights — North Batan and Sabtang Island

3D2N (North Batan & Sabtang) RATE SHEET


3 Days/2 Nights — South Batan and Sabtang Island

3D2N (South Batan & Sabtang) RATE SHEET


3 Days/2 Nights — North Batan, South Batan, and Sabtang Island

3D2N (North Batan, South Batan & Sabtang) RATE SHEET


4 Days/3 Nights — North Batan, South Batan, and Sabtang Island

4D3N (North Batan, South Batan & Sabtang) RATE SHEET


5 Days/4 Nights — North Batan, South Batan, and Sabtang Island

5D4N (North Batan, South Batan & Sabtang) RATE SHEET


6 Days/5 Nights — North Batan, South Batan, and Sabtang Island

6D5N (North Batan, South Batan & Sabtang) RATE SHEET


As mentioned above, please direct all your queries to book@travelyoung.ph as I am just reposting this info and wouldn’t be able to speak for them. 🙂 I can tell you, though, that you will love Batanes.

You can find out more about Batanes from these posts:

Batanes: FAQs

How much will a Batanes trip cost?

16 Places in Batanes That Will Make You Never Want to Leave (or Make You Start Planning Your Return ASAP)

Unbreakable

The Ordinary

The Ivatans of Batanes

The Rolling Hills of Batanes

Because He has nothing better to do?

CoverArt_Batanes_01

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Batanes sale! PAL Manila-Basco-Manila tickets for only P4,000+ — several dates available

BatanesFor the past months, the cheapest Batanes tickets have been PHP 6,000+ (with the most expensive at nearly PHP 20,000) so this latest crop of PHP 4,000+ tickets is a very good deal. Just click on the screenshots below to take a closer look — the dates with the red stars are the cheapest. Travel dates range from July to October 2015.

Manila-Basco July9-14

Manila-Basco August2-6

Manila-Basco August8-13

Manila-Basco August22-27

Manila-Basco September10-16

Manila-Basco September24-29

Manila-Basco October2-6

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The Philippines

BatanesBatanes

bor_01Boracay

cdo_10Cagayan de Oro

1000w_cebu_2013_sumilon_02Cebu

Descent_Dumaguete_Casaroro-Falls_01Dumaguete

morefun_07Life in the Philippines

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Last updated 18 February 2015
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7 things you should know before planning your trip to Batanes

Answers to frequently asked questions about the paradise in the far north of the Philippines
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Batanes

 

1. How much will a Batanes trip cost?

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First of all, I’m not going to play the my-Batanes-trip-was-cheaper-than-yours game. My Manila-Basco-Manila ticket, bought during a Philippine Airlines promo, cost me less than P1,500 (yep, round trip) but if I give you a Batanes budget based on that, you’ll just end up really frustrated if you get your ticket at P16,000, or if you wait and wait (and wait, and wait) for a PAL sale that doesn’t happen. Right?

So my advice is: budget P12,000 for 4 days and 3 nights, including airfare. (See How much will a Batanes trip cost? for the details.)

If you get a cheap ticket, great — you can join a package tour, sleep in a nice B&B, eat better. If your ticket is a bit more expensive, that’s okay — do a DIY tour and scrimp on the lodgings and food. If you manage to get the cost of your entire trip down to P6,000, awesome — you have an extra P6,000 saved for your next trip. And if you bought the P16,000 ticket, you probably don’t have money problems and this whole answer won’t matter. 🙂

2. Is Fundacion Pacita worth the splurge?

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To be honest…not really. Batanes is so beautiful by itself that you don’t really need a beautiful hotel. And I like to spread the love around when I travel; Fundacion Pacita is the go-to place for drug companies looking to bribe pamper their doctor friends, so it doesn’t really need my money. But if you can afford it, and you really want it, go for it. It’s a pretty place.

Descent_Batanes_02

 

3. Philippine Airlines or Skyjet?

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Philippine Airlines
! And it’s not because I grew up flying PAL. Skyjet flights are less frequent so if yours gets canceled or if you miss it for any other reason, you’ll have to wait 2 days for the next one. And, oh, the Skyjet horror stories! Philippine Airlines doesn’t exactly have an unblemished record, but compared to the other airlines in the country, they still probably have the best regard for their passengers.

4. Package tour or DIY?

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Batanes doesn’t really have public transport plying the roads. Instead there are tricycles (tuk-tuks), standing by in a terminal, that you can call for when needed, sort of like a taxi. Doing a DIY tour is therefore trickier but not at all impossible. Aside from tricycles, you can rent a motorcycle (with or without a driver) or a bicycle to go around.

If you go the DIY route, check out 16 Places in Batanes That Will Make You Never Want to Leave (or Make You Start Planning Your Return ASAP) for a list of attractions you won’t want to miss.

Package tours are of course more expensive (mine was P5,200) and will probably account for 40% of your budget but they are less of a hassle because they usually include lunch, transportation (including boat fares), municipal fees, guide fees, etc. In short, it depends on how much money, time, and effort you’re willing to spend.

Batanes

 

5. When is the best time to go?

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February-ish, according to the locals, when the temperatures are just right. Summer may be peak season, but it’s NOT the best time to go there, as the grass tends to be dry then and might look dull or dying in your photos. That said, you don’t always have much choice in when you can go, especially if you’re looking for promo fares, so go whenever you can.

6. What should you wear in Batanes?

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It amuses the locals to no end when people step off the plane wearing shorts in winter. The answer is: whatever is appropriate for the season. Bring footwear that you can get wet, especially if you’re crossing to Sabtang and/or Itbayat.

7. Is July still summer or rainy season?

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I don’t know if this will qualify as “frequently asked” but I actually devoted a lot of time researching this last year because my trip was scheduled for July. (Airfares tend to be cheaper around July.) Most blogs said July is already rainy season but there was this one rather well-known blog that said July was still summer season, so this question was one of the very first ones I asked the Batanes locals when I got there. Their answer: July is rainy season.

That said, it’s really more of a “shoulder” season, a transition from summer to rainy. When I was there, it rained several times, but when it wasn’t raining, it was really hot. The nice thing about July was that the sun still shone during most of the day but there had already been enough rain to make the grass green again post-summer. If you’re going in July, bring rain gear and sunblock (which you should do anyway, regardless of when you go).

CoverArt_Batanes_01

Is Batanes worth it?

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No question: absolutely!



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Do you consider yourself a blogger?

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In these mountains, to be specific

In these mountains, to be specific

Blogger ka ba?”
(“Are you a blogger?”)

Not such a hard question, was it? I was up in the mountains of Batanes, exchanging pleasantries with fellow tourists, and one of them had come up with this query…that strangely rendered me speechless.

My first thought was: what gave me away?! Was there a blogger look I had unconsciously emulated? Did my eyes have a squint, say, that spoke of too much time in front of a computer screen? Did my fingertips have telltale signs of late-night key-pounding activities? Had someone stamped “I have a travel blog” on my forehead?

And there was the question itself: was I a blogger? Is everyone who blogs a blogger? Not all people who swim are swimmers, are they? Not every Tom, Dick, and Harry who takes photos is a photographer. I suppose a distinction could be made between professional bloggers and hobby bloggers. But that begs the question: how do you define a professional blogger? Is it someone who earns from blogging? Or is it someone who approaches blogging as he would a profession, that is, a “job that requires special education, training, or skill”?

Me — I’m that girl who blows off could-have-been-billable hours on a post that could very well be read by only a handful of people. I spend an inordinate amount of time on one sentence: I move my words around, I tinker with the phrasing, and when I go down to get coffee I’m still thinking about what I’ve written or what I’m about to write, trying the words out in my head to see if they’ve got the cadence I’m after.

Does that make me better than others? Not really. But perhaps that’s what made me overthink what was, after all, a really simple question.

“I…have a blog,” I said.

I’m curious — do you call yourself a blogger?

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Do you consider yourself a blogger?” was created by LSS for travel site Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved.

16 Places in Batanes That Will Make You Never Want to Leave (or Make You Start Planning Your Return ASAP)

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Whether you’re in Batanes for 2 days or 2 weeks, joining a tour group or going DIY, these are the stunningly gorgeous spots that will make you fall in love with the Philippines’ northernmost province — so much so that you’ll start keeping an eye out for seat sales the moment you get back home!

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NORTH BATAN

 

Basco Lighthouse_01

Basco Lighthouse and Naidi Hills
The iconic Basco lighthouse is one of the highlights of the North Batan tour and is the perfect place to watch the sunset. It can also be reached by a leisurely 30-minute walk from the town center.

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The view from Fundacion Pacita's dining area

Fundacion Pacita
The Fundacion Pacita Batanes Nature Lodge was the home of acclaimed artist Pacita Abad and is now an exclusive (and expensive) boutique hotel. Its proceeds fund projects for Ivatan artists, educational grants, and eco-tourism programs.

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Mount Carmel Chapel_03Chapel of Our Lady of Mount Carmel
A charming little chapel built in the tradition of old Ivatan stone houses, the breathtaking views from its beautifully built doors and windows will make you believe there is a God.

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Rolling Hills_06Rolling Hills
In these sprawling emerald hills — a pasture for goats, cows and carabaos (Philippine water buffalo) — you could point your lens towards a random spot, take a random shot, at a random angle and focus, and your photo would still come out perfect.

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Boulder Beach_001Boulder Beach
When Mt. Iraya erupted all those years ago, it rained molten rocks on Batan island’s east coast, eventually leaving behind the boulders that now adorn this beach. The stones, waves, and surrounding cliffs are particularly gorgeous during sunrise.

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SOUTH BATAN

 

Batan_06White Beach
Visit this secluded strip of sand on a misty morning and you’ll never want to leave.

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Boat Shelter Port_01Boat Shelter Port
A touch of Venice! Functionally, this port is where marine vessels seek refuge during inclement weather, but the profusion of outrigger-less boats floating on a watery avenue will no doubt remind visitors of a certain Italian city.

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Batan_09Alapad Hill and Rock Formation
Aside from the chance to see goats risking their lives to graze on steep hills, this spot also offers views of grass-cloaked mountains, glorious cliffs, and waves furiously crashing against stoic rocks.

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Chawa Viewing Deck_04Chawa Viewing Deck
From this vantage point — often the first stop on the South Batan tour — one can behold otherworldly cliffs, sun-kissed hills, deep blue seas, frothy waves, and the majestic Mount Iraya.

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Racuh a Payaman_02Racuh a Payaman
Its colloquial name, Marlboro Country, is pretty apt: Racuh a Payaman has just the sort of vast, rugged, grassy terrain through which the Marlboro Man can be expected to gallop. Although horses have been known to graze here in the past, nowadays the primary residents are carabaos — and tourists marveling at the stunning views.

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Tayid Lighthouse_01Tayid (Mahatao) Lighthouse
The original lighthouses in Mahatao were two stone structures situated several meters apart: once their two points of light converged, sailors knew they were at the right spot for entering the town port. This newer, prettier lighthouse is perched on top of the Mahatao mountains and commands views of sprawling hills and sparkling seas.

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SABTANG ISLAND

Sabtang LighthouseSabtang Lighthouse
The last of three lighthouses in Batanes, this edifice is the most prominent feature of the Sabtang coastline and is as picture-perfect as its two counterparts in Batan island.

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Sabtang_Savidug Village_01Savidug Village
Traditional Ivatan stone houses, separated from the sea by a row of coconut trees and a beach dotted by fishing boats, transport the wanderer back to simpler times.

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Sabtang_Chavayan Village_03 (2)Chavayan Village
Brightly colored windows add a touch of whimsy to sturdy stone dwellings built by Ivatans in the shadow of legends.

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Sabtang_05Morong Beach and Mahayaw Arch
It’s hard to resist taking a dip in the cool, clean waters of this fine, white sand beach — or taking a selfie with the Mahayaw Arch as the perfect natural frame.

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Chamantad-Tinyan Viewpoint_03Chamantad-Tinyan Viewpoint
If the wind here doesn’t blow you away, the view undoubtedly will: behind you, towering rocks, under which goats and carabaos contentedly graze; before you, craggy slopes and grassy hills recalling landscapes from Lord of the Rings; and below you, a steady procession of unruly white waves stemming from seas of crystal blue.

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BONUS!
#17

Maywang A Libro Du VatanMaywang A Libro Du Vatan
Leave a piece of yourself in Batanes. This archive of blank books, located within the grounds of the San Carlos Borromeo Church in Mahatao, lets you leave a message, a prayer, or…anything, really, within the pages of any book you choose. I randomly pulled out book 156. Or was it 165?? I guess I’ll find out when I return.



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small-town girl travel_you can do it too

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