Before you book a flight with AirAsia Zest (Philippines), consider this.

Air Asia plane

  1. They cancelled flights between Cebu and Cagayan de Oro starting last July 1, 2015.

    Air Asia Cebu Cagayan de Oro flights cancelled

    Email notification for cancelled Cebu-Cagayan de Oro flights

  2. They are cancelling flights between Cebu and Davao starting September 1, 2015.

    Air Asia Cebu Davao flights cancelled

    Email notification for cancelled Cebu-Davao flights

  3. If they’re cancelling flights between major cities, who knows what flights they’re going to cancel next? For those of us who take advantage of seat sales to book flights months ahead of departure, this recent spate of flight cancellations “due to commercial considerations” is disheartening.
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  4. Unless your flight is within 30 days of the start of cancellation, YOU have to get in touch with THEM to inform them of whether you want your flight rebooked or if you want a refund. (See second-from-last paragraphs in the screenshots above. If you want to actually talk to someone, you have to call a Manila number — and pay long-distance charges if necessary — to remedy them cancelling your flight. In comparison, Cebu Pacific, for all its many faults, at least makes the effort to get in touch with you and ask you what you want done with your booking — which is the least they could do, I think, after taking your money then basically messing up all your plans.)
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  5. If you paid through Cebuana Lhuiller or another payment center, you can’t use the online form because in “Booking Payment” the only options are Credit Card, Cash, and Bank/Direct Debit.

    Air Asia online form for refunds

    Limited choices for Booking Payment — what do you do if you paid through Cebuana Lhuiller?

  6. I go online and choose full refund. Two days later, I receive an email telling me my refund would take up to 30 days. Fine. Mere moments later, I get another email telling me they’ve given me credit to use for a future Air Asia booking. Huh? What happened to the refund?
    Air Asia refund

    First a refund…

    Air Asia credit shell

    …then a credit shell. What?

Other things:

  • They charge you extra when you book using a credit card or any other payment option other than their in-house prepaid card or Dragonpay. So when they advertise that their “all-in” fare is, say, PHP 999, you actually pay more than that if you pay through your regular credit card.
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  • My aunt recently traveled between Cebu and Cagayan de Oro with Air Asia. Days before the flight, there were several schedule changes, and some of the notices mixed up the flight number and the route, so we were confused which flight had been changed. On both flights, apart from the announced schedule change, there was a delay of around 4 hours, during which there was little to no communication from Air Asia staff about what was going on.
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  • One time, I tried to have BIG points retroactively credited to my account — something they allow and actually set up an online system for — and it took them 6 weeks to do it. Six weeks. You have to wonder what is going on behind the scenes, what processes do they have, that it takes them 6 weeks to check that a person bought a ticket and flew on a flight.
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  • Speaking of system, one time, they charged me twice for flight add-ons (baggage, meal and seat selection). It was their mistake, but of course I was the one who had to take precious time to sort it out with my bank. Again you have to wonder what’s going on with their system that things like that happen (it’s the only time that’s ever happened to me).

For what it’s worth, I’ve had mostly good experiences with Air Asia in international flights, and I’m sure other people have had good experiences with their domestic flights too. And they’ve recently flown their 300 millionth customer, so that’s something. But it’s just that…when things go wrong, they go Wrong, and their system can’t seem to handle it well. So that’s something to think about before booking with AirAsia Zest: if things go wrong, are you prepared to grapple with a strangely functioning system that doesn’t have a human face?

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© Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved. 

 


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Can you pool your baggage allowances if you’re traveling as a group?

dfabi_luggage_cebu pacific_01*
If you’re traveling as a group — if you’re traveling with your family, say, or with a group of friends — will airlines allow you to combine your respective baggage allowances? That is, if there are 4 of you, and each person is allowed 20 kg checked baggage each, can one person’s bag weigh more than 20 kg, for as long as the total baggage weight for all four does not exceed 80 kg?

A friend asked me this question yesterday. I always thought it was okay as long as the group had booked together, but I couldn’t find a definite answer in their airline’s website so I asked KLM directly (via Twitter). This was their answer:
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KLM

BaggageAllowancePooling_KLM

As of 15 April 2015

Unless there’s an “informal” way to do it, it looks like you can’t pool baggage allowances with KLM.

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So then I looked into the baggage policies of airlines that I’ll be flying with (or planning to fly with) in the next year.

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Cebu Pacific

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“Yes, as long as everyone in the group is booked under one record locator and they are all present at time of check-in.” Cebu Pacific website > Ask Ceb > Prepaid Baggage

BaggageAllowancePooling_CebuPacific

As of 15 April 2015

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Air Asia

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“Checked baggage weight can only be shared with passengers in the same booking number.” Air Asia website > Travel information (dropdown) > Baggage info > Checked baggage

BaggageAllowancePooling_AirAsia

As of 15 April 2015

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Philippine Airlines

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“Please coordinate with the check-in counter and request to pool their [sic] baggage. Passengers should all be present during check in and should be ready for individual verification.” (Update as of 16 Apr 2015, 1340h)

As of 16 April 2015

As of 16 April 2015

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I couldn’t find the info I needed in PAL’s website, so I asked them on both Twitter and Facebook if they allow baggage allowance pooling. In response, they asked me for my “flight route, 6-letter reservation codes and ticket numbers that start with 211 or 079.” The rest of the conversation you can see above.

(Yes, they asked for flight details and then told me anyway to call the hotline. That pissed me off a bit — why should anyone have to call a Manila number, and pay long-distance charges in my case, to get the answer to a simple query? For that matter, why should anyone’s flight details matter in a simple question of policy? Anyway, it looks like it was all a roundabout way of saying they didn’t know the answer yet. Today, they got back to me with the answer from the “concerned office” and it still isn’t a plain yes or no — just to make arrangements with the staff at the check-in counter. If counter staff says no, there doesn’t seem to be a black-and-white policy for anyone to fall back on. Like I said, I have a fondness for PAL and an even greater fondness for PAL employees, but I swear to God, sometimes… It’s such a simple thing. Somebody from the “concerned office” please grow brass ones and make it a policy already.)

ANYWAY.

The answer to the question is: it depends on your airline. If you’re traveling in a group and planning to pool your baggage allowances, make sure to check first if your airline allows it.

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Can you pool your baggage allowances if you’re traveling as a group?” was created by LSS for travel site Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved. 

One other (very important) thing you should consider before getting the Air Asia ASEAN Pass: flight availability

Air Asia ASEAN Pass

Image from the AirAsia website

In Should you get the Air Asia ASEAN Pass? I discussed the details and laid out the pros and cons of the credit-based travel pass launched last month by Air Asia. The Pass seems like a pretty good deal at first glance — 10 credits (covering the base fare for 3-10 flights) for only PHP 7,200, or 20 credits (6-20 flights) for only PHP12,900. The ASEAN Pass and the ASEAN Pass+ only have a 30- to 60-day travel validity, respectively, but those should be enough for anyone planning, say, a backpacking trip across Southeast Asia.

(See a sample 5-country itinerary using the 20-credit ASEAN Pass+ here.)

I didn’t get an ASEAN Pass for myself for several reasons:

  1. A straight 30-day trip (and much less a 60-day one) just isn’t feasible at this point for me.
  2. I have a few travels mapped out for the rest of the year and can’t afford to squeeze in a Southeast Asian jaunt.
  3. I’m not in a hurry to go anywhere and can wait for a big sale from Air Asia, where base fares can drop to as low as PHP 1.

Now there’s another reason I wouldn’t rush to buy an ASEAN Pass just yet: flight availability to/from the Philippines.

Several people have generously shared their experience with the Pass in the first article, and it looks like many of them have had difficulty redeeming their credits for flights to and from Manila. It’s not that there are no seats available — you can still book flights the usual way — but there seem to be no seats available for passholders. It looks like Air Asia is limiting the flights (and number of seats per flight) that they allocate to passengers who are using the ASEAN Pass.

(Joseph of Your Travel Path details this and other problems he had with the Air Asia ASEAN Pass here. Rupert of Dream Travel On Points suggests a work-around: pay for your flight from Manila to KL/KK with cash and use your ASEAN Pass from there.)

This might not be a problem for flights to/from your city/country so I suggest that you also try to get feedback from Passholders in your area. Or this might not be a problem at all for you, if you’re the type of traveler whose plan is to have no plan and to go where the wind takes you. I should add that my first taste of Europe was via Air Asia (through their shortlived Kuala Lumpur – Paris Orly flights), I have several upcoming flights with them, and I am especially rooting for them after the recent tragedy involving one of their flights, so I hope that they will find a way to fix whatever problems people may be having with the ASEAN Pass.

Have you bought the Air Asia ASEAN Pass? We’d love to hear about your experiences in the Comments section below.

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One other (very important) thing you should consider before getting the Air Asia ASEAN Pass: flight availability” was created by LSS for travel site Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved.

Air Asia Asean Pass+ (20 credits) Sample Itinerary

If you’re thinking of getting the Air Asia Asean Pass Plus — the one that gives you 20 credits and costs PHP 12,900 — here’s a sample itinerary to give you an idea of where you could go. The numbers on the left side show how many credits you will need to fly between the destinations immediately above and below it; I made sure it totaled 20 to make the most of the pass! It’s the itinerary that I mapped out yesterday for myself — just to get the feel of the Pass and figure out its pros and cons — so it starts and ends in Cebu. Feel free to adapt (using Air Asia’s list of redeemable routes and corresponding credits) or totally adopt as you see fit.

Before you click the “Buy now” button, though, read this for the Pass pros and cons: Should you get the Air Asia ASEAN Pass?

And as a side note — is it just me or is travel planning fun?! This itinerary took some time to put together but I loved doing it, even though I’m not likely to use it anytime soon, or probably ever. There’s this school of thought that people who make travel lists are sheep, blindly going by what other people say they should do, but not only can planning and list-building 1) be self-directed, 2) save time for when you’re actually in the place, and 3) help you save tons of money for things like trains and hotels, it is also honestly just fun! Well, for me anyway.

asean pass itinerary_20 credits_10 cities_5 countries_01

Happy travels!

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Air Asia Asean Pass+ (20 credits) Sample Itinerary” was created by LSS for travel site Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved. 

Should you get the Air Asia ASEAN Pass?

Air Asia ASEAN Pass

Air Asia recently launched the ASEAN Pass, a travel pass with a certain number of credits that you can use to book flights between numerous destinations in the ASEAN region. Should you get one?

Here’s how it works. You can choose to buy either the:

  • Air Asia ASEAN Pass — 10 credits – 30 days travel validity – PHP 7,200
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  • Air Asia ASEAN Pass + — 20 credits – 60 days travel validity – PHP 12,900*
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    See a sample 5-country (10-city) itinerary utilizing all 20 credits of the Air Asia ASEAN Pass+ HERE
    .

You can then use your credits to redeem flights between ASEAN destinations. For example, you can book the following flights for the corresponding number of credits:

  • Bangkok to Siem Reap = 1 credit
  • Kuala Lumpur to Phuket = 1 credit
  • Singapore to Yogyakarta = 3 credits
  • Bangkok to Bali = 3 credits

Imagine what you can do with 10 credits, all for the price of P7,200.

Before you pull out your credit card, though, here are a couple of things you should consider about the Air Asia ASEAN Pass:

  1. The credit only applies to the base fare — you will still have to pay taxes and various fees depending on your place of departure. If you’re departing from Cebu, for example, you still have to pay the P1620 travel tax at the airport; some places incorporate the travel tax into the price of the ticket, which you’ll have to pay when you redeem a flight.

    Sample price for round-trip Kuala Lumpur-Siem Reap flights, 2 pax

    Sample price for round-trip Kuala Lumpur-Siem Reap flights, 2 pax

  2. The pass only covers destinations in the ASEAN region: Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam. Sorry, no Nepal!
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  3. You have to redeem your flights 14 days before departure, so while the pass does give you some flexibility in terms of travel planning, you still need to set your plans at least 2 weeks in advance, and even then it’s subject to seat availability.
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  4. You have to use the pass within 1 year of purchase. (This pretty much rules it out for me, as I’ve already got a few trips planned this year and seriously can’t afford additional adventures between now and February 2016). Expired passes cannot be refunded.
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  5. You have to use your credits within 30 days (for the PHP 7,200 pass) or within 60 days (for the PHP 12,900 pass) from your first flight. Make sure you can get enough time off work.
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  6. You cannot combine credits from two passes to redeem a flight. If you’re in Kuala Lumpur and you need to fly back to Cebu (a 3-credit route), but you only have 2 credits left on your pass, you cannot “borrow” 1 credit from your friend’s pass. You also cannot forward the remaining credits from your old pass if you decide to buy a new pass.
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  7. You cannot repeat the same route (Cebu-Manila, for example) using the same pass.
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  8. International routes to and from the Philippines are limited.
    • If you’re based in Cebu, you can only fly to and from Kota Kinabalu (1 credit) and Kuala Lumpur (3 credits).
    • If you’re in Manila, you can only fly to and from Kota Kinabalu (3 credits) and Kuala Lumpur (3 credits).

All this means you really have to be creative with your itinerary planning to make the most of your pass. You also have to consider the other expenses you will incur, such as food and accommodations. Remember that you have to fit all your travels within 30 or 60 days, so be prepared to shell out a relatively large amount of money within a relatively short period of time.

So: should you get the Air Asia ASEAN Pass?

aseanpass

If you’re someone who wants to travel within the next couple of months — meaning you can’t wait for piso sales from Air Asia or other airlines — and you want to visit many cities within the ASEAN region, and you have the money and time to do it all in one go, I think you SHOULD get the Pass.

Otherwise, here are my recommendations:

  • Map out a proposed travel itinerary before you book. (It’s not as easy as it sounds! That is if you plan to use all your credits without spending for an additional flight or two.) The Air Asia ASEAN Pass page contains a list of routes that you can redeem with your ASEAN Pass and their corresponding credits. In making your itinerary, consider the possibility of traveling by land (bus or train) between nearby destinations to save on credits. Try to explore different combinations: for example, Singapore-Bangkok will cost you 3 credits, but Singapore-Krabi and Krabi-Bangkok will just cost you 1 credit each for a total of 2 credits (and you get to stop by Krabi!).
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  • Book your pass 10-11 months before your intended travel dates. This will give you enough time to save for your expenses and still travel within your pass validity.
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  • If you can spare the time and money, book the 60-day ASEAN Pass that will give you 20 credits for PHP 12,900. Not only will each credit be slightly cheaper, you will also have more options in terms of planning your destinations.
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  • If you’re online a lot and you don’t have to travel right away, consider just waiting for an Air Asia piso sale and individually booking each flight in your itinerary. You’ll have less flexibility but I can guarantee it will be cheaper — only PHP 1 base fare, or a total of PHP 10 base fare for 10 flights! Plus, instead of feeling pressured to cram as many destinations as you can into a 30-day or 60-day window to make the most of your pass, waiting for sales gives you the option to decide you just want to visit 2 or 3 cities this time around, with the knowledge that there are sure to be other sales for other travel dates and destinations.
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Let me know what you think!

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“Should you get the Air Asia ASEAN Pass?”
Created by LSS for travel site Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved. 



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Airline Policies for Pregnant Passengers

SampleMe_11SampleMe_11SampleMe_11*

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Quick Look

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AIRLINE   EXPECTANT MOTHERS CANNOT TRAVEL BEYOND
Philippine Airlines 35 weeks
Cebu Pacific See below
Air Asia 35 weeks

If you are not beyond the airlines’ cutoff for carriage, you can still travel but you will need a medical certificate. The different airlines’ policies vary so please read below for the details.
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Philippine Airlines
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  • Below 24 weeks — The pregnant passenger should fill up Part 1 of the Expectant Mothers Information Sheet (EMIS) Form.
  • 24 to 32 weeks — The personal physician of the pregnant passenger should fill up Part 2 of the EMIS Form.
  • Beyond 32 weeks — A PAL physician (Flight Surgeon or Company Physician) should fill up Part 3 of the EMIS Form and issue a clearance for travel.
  • Beyond 35 weeks — Will not be accepted for carriage by PAL.

Note:

  • Expectant mothers need to fill up the EMIS form on a per flight basis.
  • The EMIS form is only valid for 7 days from the date of issuance.
  • If the expectant mother is below 21 years of age, written consent of the husband, parent or guardian must be secured.

Source: http://www.philippineairlines.com/ph/Home/TravelInformation/BeforeYouFly/SpecialHandling/ExpectantMothers 

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Cebu Pacific
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(Updated April 2016)

  • 34 weeks AOG and beyond – Present a medical certificate with the notation “Fit to Travel” and signed by a physician. Travel must be completed within the validity period of the medical certificate — ten (10) days from date of issuance. Exception: flights to or from the United States, where the expectant mother is only required to submit a medical certificate for her outbound travel, and the medical certificate must be dated within ten (10) days of the scheduled date of initial departure.
  • High risk pregnancies “such that a condition exists that creates a reasonable doubt that the mother or baby can complete the flight safely without needing extraordinary medical care” – Same requirements and exceptions as pregnancies 34 weeks AOG and beyond

The Cebu Pacific General Terms and Conditions of Carriage of Passengers and Baggage is now silent as to the requirements for pregnancies below 34 weeks age of gestation. These were the previous requirements:

  • Below 24 weeks — Fill up the Special Handling Form.
  • 24 to 34 weeks — “The Special Handling Form is required to be presented together with a medical certificate stating age of gestation with notation “Fit to Travel” and signed by the pregnant passenger’s personal OB-Gyne. Pregnant passenger must complete her travel within the validity period of the medical certificate which should be seven (7) days from date of issuance.”

Source: https://www.cebupacificair.com/Pages/terms-and-conditions-of-carriage.aspx

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Air Asia
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  • Up to 27 weeks — Complete the AirAsia/AirAsia X Liability Statement at the check-in counter.
  • 28 to 34 weeks — “Submit a doctor’s letter or a medical certificate confirming the number of weeks of pregnancy. The letter or certificate must not be dated more than 30 days from the date of travel.” Complete the AirAsia/AirAsia X Liability Statement at the check-in counter.
  • 35 weeks or more — Will not be allowed to travel with AirAsia/AirAsia X.

Source: http://www.airasia.com/ph/en/at-the-airport/special-guests.page

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Airline Policies for Pregnant Passengers
© Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved. Contents verified as of 04 April 2016.

 

 


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14 Stunning Destinations on Air Asia’s Route Map (Countries A-I)

“Seat sale” — ah, the two sweetest words in the universe for those of us whose pockets can’t quite keep up with our travel dreams. Sometimes, though, it seems like our dream destinations never go on sale when we want them to (hello, Batanes) or the discounted prices are still too steep (*sob* Paris).

Well, maybe we should change our strategy! Instead of waiting for our bucket list destinations to go on sale, maybe we should look at the destinations on sale and add them to our bucket list.

Air Asia seat sale? Here are some of the gorgeous sights and destinations you should be looking at:

1. Adelaide, Australia

Adelaide Zoo

Image by Kelly Byrne (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Kelly Byrne (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Morialta Conservation Park

Image by Peripitus (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by Peripitus (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by Peter Neaum (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Peter Neaum (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Victor Harbor

Image by Ian W. Fieggen (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Ian W. Fieggen (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

2. Gold Coast, Australia

Image by Alpha (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by Alpha (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

3. Melbourne, Australia

Royal Exhibition Building

Image by Diliff / Ian Fieggen (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Diliff / Ian Fieggen (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Yarra River

Image by Donaldytong (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Donaldytong (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Phillip Island

Image by Chensiyuan (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by Chensiyuan (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by Paul Gear (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Paul Gear (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

4. Perth, Australia

Penguin Island

Image by Zigzig20s (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Zigzig20s (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Gnangarra (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Gnangarra (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Rottnest Island

Image by pat_ong (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by pat_ong (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Cas Liber (Public domain)

Image by Cas Liber (Public domain)

5. Sydney, Australia

Blue Mountains

Image by popejon2 (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by popejon2 (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Jennifer Morrow (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Jennifer Morrow (CC-BY-2.0)

Three Sisters (Blue Mountains)

Image by Ali b (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Ali b (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Lake Burragorang (Blue Mountains)

Image by Roger Barnes (CC-BY-2.5)

Image by Roger Barnes (CC-BY-2.5)

Royal National Park

Image by Inas (Public domain)

Image by Inas (Public domain)

Image by Maksym Kozlenko (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Maksym Kozlenko (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Sydney Opera House

Image by Diliff (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Diliff (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Taronga Zoo

Image by Jan Derk (Public domain)

Image by Jan Derk (Public domain)

6. Brunei, Brunei Darussalam

Sultan Omar Ali Saifuddin Mosque

Image by sam garza (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by sam garza (CC-BY-2.0)

7. Phnom Penh, Cambodia

Image by dalbera (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by dalbera (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by McKay Savage (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by McKay Savage (CC-BY-2.0)

8. Siem Reap, Cambodia

Angkor Wat

Image by David Sim (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by David Sim (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by sam garza (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by sam garza (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Chris (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by Chris (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

9. Beijing, China

Forbidden City

Image by Pixelflake (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Pixelflake (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by kallgan (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by kallgan (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by star5112 (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by star5112 (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Great Wall of China

Image by Hao Wei (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Hao Wei (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Craig Nagy (Frayed) (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by Craig Nagy (Frayed) (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by Saad Akhtar (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Saad Akhtar (CC-BY-2.0)

10. Shanghai, China

Image by Fanghong (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Fanghong (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Kevinsmithnyc (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Kevinsmithnyc (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Bernt Rostad (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by Bernt Rostad (CC-BY-2.0)

11. Hong Kong

Image by WiNG (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by WiNG (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Hunchback BBC (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by Hunchback BBC (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

12. Kolkata, India

Victoria Memorial

Image by Washedwall (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Washedwall (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

13. Bali, Indonesia

Image by chensiyuan (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by chensiyuan (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by Yves Picq http://veton.picq.fr (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

Image by Yves Picq http://veton.picq.fr (CC-BY-SA-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)

14. Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Prambanan

Image by Jimmy McIntyre (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by Jimmy McIntyre (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by Jimmy McIntyre (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Image by Jimmy McIntyre (CC-BY-SA-2.0)

Borobodur

Image by PL09Puryono (CC0)

Image by PL09Puryono (CC0)

Image by Bennylin (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by Bennylin (CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Image by ctsnow (CC-BY-2.0)

Image by ctsnow (CC-BY-2.0)

 

14 Stunning Destinations on Air Asia’s Route Map (Countries A-I)” was created by LSS for travel site Small-Town Girls, Midnight Trains. All rights reserved.